Get Hired - 3 Tips to Pass Every Phone Interview

A few months ago I started a blog series on how to improve your chances at each stage of the interview process. In the first two parts I focused on the top of the funnel – specifically, how to make your applications and resume jump out of the applicant pool so you get more interviews. Check out part 1 and part 2 for some context. In this blog I’m going to focus on the next phase of the job search process – the phone screen.

Also, if you haven't already, check out my blog on resumes. I'll show you the resume I use and give you access to my resume template for Microsoft Word.

The Job Search Funnel

The Job Search Funnel

The phone screen is a standard step in most corporate recruitment processes. Human resources departments and recruiters need to reduce the field of candidates down to a subset that actually stand a chance of getting the job.

Of all the stages in the job search process, the phone screen is the easiest for you to control. There is no reason to fail at this stage if you execute the correct strategy. I’d go further to say that it’s actually quite critical for you to convert phone screens at an extremely high rate in light of the rapidly growing competitiveness of job searches today. Unlike the first stage i.e. getting noticed, and the latter stages i.e. in person interviews, the phone screen is actually quite easy to master – it’s formulaic. But to master the formula you must first understand the mindset of the phone screener.

Phone screens are typically conducted by an in house HR person or an external recruiter. Sometimes you’ll actually have to go through both. In either case there are three primary motivations that govern their behavior and decision making.

1.       The need to reduce the field: The phone screener’s job is to reduce the total pool of possible applicants down to a more manageable number. If fifty resumes meet some basic level of qualification, the screener needs to reduce the field down to 7-10 people for the hiring manager to actually interview. This has implications on the tactics you need to employ to make it through this step. You can’t win the job in this stage – you can only lose.

2.       The desire to avoid the big mistake: Whether the screener is an internal resource or an external consultant, the last thing they want to do is waste the hiring manager’s time by passing along a bad candidate. Some candidates will be better than others, but under no circumstance does the screener want to risk putting forth a completely unqualified or incompetent candidate. Again this has an impact on your optimal strategy. You generally need to play it quite safe and conservative so the screener can be confident you won’t embarrass him or her.

3.       The mandate to identify cultural fit: One of HR’s primary roles in the company is to maintain and grow the corporate culture. Since the screener most often lacks the specific domain expertise to measure depth of competence, they typically focus on personality and cultural fit to help determine which applicants advance to the next stage. You job in the phone screen is to appear like someone who will be easy to work with – I’ve seen many candidates fail at this stage because they come off as over confident in their misguided effort to convey competency.

There are a couple of things may have jumped out at you in that list. For one, screeners tend to be quite defensive in their approach i.e. they aren't typically focused on hitting a home-run but rather they focus on passing along consistently solid candidates while avoiding the big mistake. Secondly, because phone screeners aren't generally experts in the field or function they’re screening for, they tend to rely heavily personality fit and on the job description as the measuring stick for qualification – sometimes to a fault.

So what does this mean for your optimal strategy? Here are three tactics to employ on your next phone screen. They take advantage of what we know about the motivations of the screeners themselves and are designed to help you take advantage of the system to get past this step and onto the in-person interview more consistently. If you can raise your batting average at this stage, you’ll significantly improve your overall chances of landing a job.

1.       Master the job description: The job description that you read on the internet was probably the last communication the hiring manager had with the phone screener about what the ideal candidate should look like. Because the screener is not an expert in the field or function he or she is interviewing you about, they will treat the job description like the bible. Your best opportunity to pass this stage of the process is to study the job description, break it down piece by piece and have a prepared answer for every aspect of it. If there are qualifications in the job description that you don’t have, you should have an answer prepared in advance for that with the strongest counterpoint you can think of. For example if applied for a marketing job that required experience in a marketing automation system or software program that I didn't have, I would prepare the following response and deliver it with confidence:

“I see that you’d ideally like to find candidates who have experience with application X. As you can see from my resume, while I haven’t used that specific application in practice, I have proven to be a quick learner when it comes to new systems and processes. So much so that I spent a few hours over the weekend watching tutorials and videos on best practices for using application X and I’m already making progress towards learning it.”

2.       Deliver the keywords: Phone screeners are taking notes and looking for some key points to underscore in their case for why you are a good candidate to pass along to the hiring manager. It’s your job to make it easy for them to build that case. The best way to do that is to focus on saying the most important keywords over and over again. Look through the job description again and pick out your strongest points relative to the requirements. Then identify the most powerful keywords from the job description that you can leverage. For example if the job description requirement was:

“Extensive experience developing front end interfaces using JavaScript and Jquery.”

I would make a point of saying “JavaScript and Jquery” at least three or four times in the phone call. And at the end of the call I’d make sure I closed with a summary of the keywords I most aligned with. This way you make certain the screener has some specific notes on your strengths in relation to the job description. It should go without saying that if you’re asked about your strengths specifically on the interview, you should make certain your answers align to what is written in the job description. It doesn't do you any good to talk about your strength as a “great communicator” when communication skills weren't listed as a key requirement in the job description.

3.       Prep your cultural message: Inevitably in the course of the interview the screener will ask you a rather innocuous sounding question about the type of work environment you like or what your former colleagues would say about how you were to work with. Most of us consider this to be a softball question so we don’t adequately prepare for it. I've seen more than a few candidates do quite poorly here and cost themselves a shot at the in-person interview. Here are a few simple do’s and don’ts for the cultural question:

  • Don’t talk about work-life balance. It’s always interpreted as “I’m lazy”.
  • Don’t ask about standard work hours or what time people come in and leave. It’s another red flag.
  • Don’t describe yourself as a perfectionist. That gets translated into “I’m a handful and control freak”
  • Do talk about being collaborative. Even if you’re not, you can never lose by saying you are.
  • Do talk about being hard working. A good work ethic can make up for limited skill sets.
  • Do talk about being detail oriented. The better option to “perfectionist”. It says you can be relied upon.

How to Jump out of the Job Applicant Pool - 5 Secrets from a Hiring Manager

Part 2:

This is part two in a series of blogs I felt compelled to write after hearing story after story from friends and family members about the escalating challenges in the current job search environment. In the first blog I talked about the legions of job-seeking superbots you now have to compete with in every career opportunity you pursue. You may not realize it yet, but your competition are applying for hundreds of jobs using a combination of technology and sweat equity to play the numbers game in hopes of muscling their way into finding work. Seemingly every job posting now has 200, 300, even 500 applicants. The strategy that got you a job three years ago won’t work anymore. It’s a new playing field and it’s getting tougher every year. But rather than lament the situation, we need to change our own game plans and stack the deck back in our favour.

If you haven't seen it already, check out my blog on how to build the perfect resume. Also check out my resume template for Microsoft Word. Its the one I recently used to beat out a ton of competing candidates to land my dream job.

Get my resume template for Microsoft Word.

A Typical Job Search Funnel

A Typical Job Search Funnel

There is a pretty standard five step process a typical applicant needs to go through in order to ultimately get a job offer. It helps to look at each step kind of like a level in a video game. Each level requires its own special set of tactics in order to pass. You need a strategy at each stage or you won’t consistently differentiate yourself enough to get the volume of job offers you want.

I have the benefit of interviewing people virtually every week so I’ve seen the best and the worst job search tactics out there. I’ve compiled a set of strategies for each stage of the job search process that I would use if I were looking for work right now – they’re like cheat codes for finding your next career.

In this blog we’ll focus on stage one – how to jump out of the applicant pool. There are two fundamental issues I see job seekers struggle with at this stage. The first is getting your application or resume seen in the first place. A friend of mine recently applied to 10 jobs on LinkedIn and told me several weeks later only 1 of the 10 applications had even been read. How are you supposed to make those numbers work? This is like a baseball player only getting one at-bat per week and expecting to perform – you need a certain minimum number of opportunities at the plate to give yourself a reasonable chance of hitting a homerun. Thankfully there are a couple tactics I’ve seen that will help you get your applications in front of more eyeballs.

The second issue many of us struggle with is how to differentiate our resume in the event it is actually read. To play the baseball metaphor again this is akin to making a good swing when you finally get a pitch to hit. You can’t hit a homerun if you don’t take a homerun swing. A recruiter I trust recently told me she spends about 30 seconds scanning each resume she reads to create the initial pool of applicants to screen. What do you need to do to make your resume stand out in 30 seconds? I’ve got a great tip that is proven to help you stand out in a pile of resumes.

Here are a few tips the will dramatically improve your success at the first stage of the job search funnel. Adopting these tactics will get you further in the job search process and ultimately improve the probability of getting a great job faster.

1.       Two Tips to Get Your Resume Seen

Use a Multi Touch Approach: If you’re only applying for jobs by sending an email to one person or applying through one channel you’re not maximizing your chances of getting noticed. The most successful job seekers take a multi touch approach to campaign for the jobs they want. Here’s a nice summary of that approach by professional resume writer Michael Howard. Rather than sending your resume to one person and hoping for the best, you need to research a variety of people in the company who might have influence on the job you’re pursuing and reach out to all of them. That list might include HR staff, the hiring manager, the department head, potential peers or even junior people in the department. You can use LinkedIn or the corporate web site to get email addresses and phone numbers for a wider number of potential influencers for the role you want.

Upgrade your LinkedIn account:

While the first tip requires a time investment, this next one requires a financial investment – albeit a small one. There are many differing opinions about the value of a premium LinkedIn account but for the purposes of making your applications stand out, I think it’s well worth it. For about $25 a month you gain access to the “Featured Applicant” status (shown in the picture), which makes all your job applications rise to the top of the pile. This is a massive step to getting more eyeballs on your resume and frankly the $25 per month investment, even when times are tight, is worth it if you land a job a week or a month sooner than you otherwise would.

2.       The Number One Way to Make Your Resume Stand Out in 30 Seconds

Build a Visual Resume:

Also known as an infographic resume or graphical resume, the visual resume is woefully underused despite its incredible power to differentiate a candidate from competing applications. Here are some examples of what I’m speaking about. I’ve probably reviewed a hundred resumes this year and maybe one of them was designed with some visual creativity. If a recruiter or hiring manager has only 30 seconds to review your resume, there is NO better way to stand out than to use this type of eye catching, visually compelling resume. Trading in your old word doc, text based resume for one of these will dramatically increase the number of phone screens and first interviews you get. They don’t guarantee you’ll get an offer, but they will get you farther in the process. There are several sites that will guide you through the process of building a visual resume – this article covers the best of them. Even if you don’t pay for a design service, you can create a very simple one like I did using standard office tools. Just by adding some colour, accents and framing around key points, your resume stands out from the crowd.

Give these tips a try and let me know if your job search improves. Next week I’ll be blogging about some sure fire tips to get past a phone screen.

If you missed the first blog in the series check it out here.

How Unrealistic Job Requirements Hurt Everyone

The gap between skills employers are demanding and the skills people actually have is widening. Job requirements are becoming completely unrealistic and its making it more difficult to find work for many people. Here is a 3 minute video clip where I talk about the problem of credential creep and how its changing the job search environment.

Let me know about your experience with credential creep in the comments section.

How to Get Your Resume Seen by More Hiring Managers

get your resume seen

I was recently invited to speak at a conference of employment services counselors. It was a great opportunity to meet a group of people who spend their entire lives on the front lines of the job search process. More than most of us, they have a keen understanding of how the job search environment has changed dramatically in the past 5 years. Here is short a clip from the session where I address one of the most important changes you need to make in your approach to improve your chances of finding a great job this year. 

If you want to learn how to build a killer resume that will differentiate you, read my blog post.

Also check out my visual resume template for Microsoft Word. Its the resume template I use and I'm sure it will work well for you too.

Email me or use the comments to let me know how these changes have affected you.

 

Top Job Search Tips: The Multi-Channel Application

Without question, the biggest challenge I hear about from the candidates I interview, friends, and people I coach, is the how difficult it has become to stand out from the growing crowds of people applying for every job. The Internet, frankly, has made it too easy to apply for work.

The Crazy Job Search Numbers Game

25 years ago you had to actually mail in your resume or physically walk into a place to apply for a job. In that world, you just didn’t have the time to apply for many roles so you had to make sure the ones you did apply for were really well suited to your skills and aspirations. That made it easier for everyone - we self-selected to a great extent. I think it also made things easier for employers because the people applying for roles really wanted the jobs they were going for and truly believed they had the qualifications to be successful. So there were fewer total applicants per job and each candidate was a better fit on average.

Even 10 years ago, before LinkedIn, and continuous streams of job postings on twitter, you were still somewhat limited to the number of jobs you could apply to by how many emails you could send.

But today, in 2015, things have completely gone off the rails.

Here’s a quick story to illustrate just how crazy things have become.

I interviewed a guy a year or so ago who dropped some knowledge on me that has been in my mind ever since.  In the course of our conversation he explained to me, quite proudly, how he’d figured out the magic formula for the job search. During the month long period he’d been looking for work he’d refined his job search process down to a science. In 30 days he had applied for 1,000 jobs to get 20 phone interviews which lead to 5 in person interviews and ultimately 1 job offer.

1,000 applications!!?? In a month!

This is the ultimate example of the environment you’re now competing in. You’re up against job seeking super bots who are playing an almost incomprehensible numbers game to find work.

How are you supposed to win in this environment?

And just in case you’re saying to yourself … “well, this sounds like an extreme example – I’m sure it’s not that bad …” Just check some random job postings on LinkedIn and you’ll see 400 and 500 applicants for every role. It’s crazy.

How supposed to stand out in a pile of 450 resumes? (Check out my blog post on this subject)

How are you supposed to match the pace of other people applying for 1,000 jobs every month?

Even if you wanted to - Do you have the time or ability or access to the tools to play this numbers game?

How do you separate yourself from the crowd and find work in THE most competitive job market we’ve ever seen?

The biggest hurdle is right up front. Separating yourself from the 449 other people who all applied for the same job. How do you get noticed at all?

The Multi-Channel Application Campaign

If you’re only applying for jobs by sending an email to one person per job or applying through one channel (e.g. company web site), you’re not maximizing your chances of getting noticed and you’re going to have a hard time getting enough first and second interviews to actually land a job.

The most successful job seekers take a multi-channel approach to each job they apply for. They don’t try to play the numbers game but they don’t use conventional tactics either. They actually campaign for the jobs they want. Unlike the numbers game playing super bots, these job seekers apply for fewer total jobs, but apply double or triple the effort for each job they choose to apply for.

In my experience as a hiring manager, this is the best way to compete and win in todays out of control job search market.

How the Multi-Channel Strategy Works

A good place to start is with a quick description of the two sources of resumes hiring managers receive. As a hiring manager myself I can boil the resumes I actually get the opportunity to look at into two camps.

The first camp are the resumes I get sent from our recruiting department. These are the HR professionals who sift through the 450 applications that come in from the website and LinkedIn and pick out 10 or 15 unicorn applications for me to review. To successfully make it through this filtering process your resume needs to be perfect and you need to check every single box. It’s extremely difficult to compete this way. My blog post on visual resumes is a good resource for improving your chances of standing out in a giant pile of 449 other resumes.

The second source of resumes that I actually read, and the focus for this blog, come from employees inside the company and former colleagues I’m still connected with in some way. Here’s why this channel is so important – I read 100% of these resumes because they came to me through people I know or work with. As a good corporate citizen and conscientious networker, I feel compelled to give these resumes my attention regardless of quality. If a guy in the IT department who I’ve never met, sends me a resume from his old college roommate for a job I’m hiring for – I read it – every time. This is completely the opposite of the first channel where you have to have a unicorn-like resume to get through the crowd.

Even more importantly, because the resume came to me from a co-worker or former colleague, I more often than not, feel compelled to at least do a phone call or exchange an email with the applicant. That can be huge – it can overcome many of the challenges you face in finding a job. If you can find your way into this group of applications, you never get screened out for not having perfect experiences or the world’s sexiest CV – if you can find some connection to the hiring manager – it doesn’t even need to be good - you give yourself a real shot.

How to put it into Action

So what can you do tomorrow to start applying the multi-channel application strategy in your own job search? Here are 4 steps I’d recommend you take to circumvent the giant line up of 450 resumes and dramatically improve your chances of getting based the first step.

1.       Apply for fewer jobs. Rather than sending your resume or application to one person per job posting for 20 different jobs and hoping for the best, apply for 5 jobs and spend 4 times as much effort on each one. This is the optimal strategy for beating your numbers game playing competitors.

2.       Identify 5 people at each target company. Use the company website, your social networks and LinkedIn to get your resume in the hands of 5 different people who work at the company you’re applying to. You will be surprised how easy it is to figure out corporate email addresses or to find some loose social connection to people at these companies.

3.       Send a short note with your resume to each person. Once you have names and email addresses for people at the company, send a short note with your resume politely asking if they would mind forwarding your resume to the hiring manager. In my experience you should get about an 80-90% hit rate on these. People like to help.

4.       Repeat for each job. Repeat this process for each of the jobs you’re applying for. It will take considerably more time than the quick hit, one shot application process, but it will dramatically increase your chances of getting to the first and second interview stage for each role you apply for.

The multi-channel campaign approach to the job search is critical to finding work in today’s hyper competitive environment. Give it a try and let me know in the comments section how it works for you.

4 Tips to get a Promotion this Year

There are three questions I get asked over and over again by friends and readers who care about advancing their careers.

  1. How do I convince my boss to give me a promotion or raise?
  2. How do I deal with a colleague who seems determined to F up my life?
  3.  How do I re-brand myself so people take me more seriously at work?

Over the next few weeks I’ll go through each one of these to give you some tips that have served me well in my career so you can avoid some of the mistakes I made along the way. Since it’s a new year and we’re all still feeling positive, let’s start with #1:

#1: How do I convince my boss to give me a promotion or raise?

The phrasing of this question is actually a great place to start. More often than not the promotion question contains phrases that sound a lot like these:

  • How do I convince my boss to give me a promotion?
  • How do I ask my boss for a promotion?
  • How can I make my boss recognize that I deserve a promotion?

If you’re thinking about the promotion process along these lines i.e. as something you have to pitch, show or make your boss do, I’m afraid you’re already heading down the wrong path. In fact, the biggest mistake I see friends and colleagues make when it comes to promotions, is that they treat them as a point in time event - a binary decision or pitch to their boss. This strategy will get you nowhere.

It doesn't help matters that so many career blogs and workplace columns focus so much time on the importance of bringing in data to support your case, preparing your pitch for a promotion etc. They’re all missing the point.

The single most important thing you can do to get a promotion is to stop thinking about it as an event or a decision, and rather turn it into a journey you go on together with your boss.

I've never asked for a promotion in my life but I've had several. As counter-intuitive as it may sound, when it comes to promotions, you have to play the long game to make them happen fast.

So how does that work?

When you frame your promotion as a journey, your boss can never say no:

If I walk into my boss’s office tomorrow and ask him to promote me to President, I’m putting him in a very difficult spot. I’m unnecessarily forcing him into making a binary decision which will more than likely result in a “no”. There are just too many reasons for him to reject this style of pitch. The timing may not be right, there may be someone in the job already, the budget might not be there, and my skills might not be adequate. By forcing him to make a discrete yes or no choice, I’m inadvertently hurting my chances for a promotion and I’m also risking the relationship I have with my boss by putting him or her in such an uncomfortable position. Making your boss uncomfortable in the promotion discussion is exactly the opposite of what you want.

The secret to getting promotions is to get your boss on your team – rooting for your success. When I’m working towards a promotion I want my boss to be my biggest cheerleader – I want my promotion to be a day he celebrates with me, not a day where I finally get him to capitulate. Turning the promotion conversation into a journey means that you reframe the conversation away from a “yes” or “no” decision and towards a “what will it take for me to get there and how can you help me” conversation – which is almost never met with a “no”. A journey, unlike a binary decision, carries no defined date, which means you’re only asking your boss to join you on a path towards a promotion which you’ll define together. This is fundamentally different from “asking” for a promotion. It turns the promotion into a win-win scenario for both parties. You give your boss the opportunity to define all the criteria and skills he’d like in his ideal candidate and you get absolute clarity and buy in on what it will take for you to get there. This approach might seem like it will take a bit longer but it’s infinitely more effective than forcing an on-the-spot decision.

Here are three ways to get your boss to join you on your promotion journey and become your biggest cheerleader:

1.       Tell your boss what you want 12 months or more before you actually want it.

This one may be frustrating for those of you who are dying for that promotion right now, but you need to be patient. The earlier you engage your boss in the promotion journey the sooner it will happen for you, but you just can’t force it.

2.       Engage your boss like a friend and mentor – not like an adversary.

People respond well to being approached as a mentor. Don’t make the promotion discussion overly formal either, keep it friendly. You want your boss to WANT to help you get there. By not forcing her to make a decision on the spot and by soliciting her help as you work towards your goal, you’ll accomplish that.

3.       Don’t focus on dates – focus on skills, deliverables and development.

You need to re-frame the promotion conversation to be about you achieving specific development milestones. Maybe you need training or you need to improve on a particularly metric or deliverable.  You need to work with your boss to set up a list of achievements that when met will mean you’re ready. This puts you in the driver’s seat and in control of how long it will take to get promoted.

4.       Maintain a regular dialogue to understand your progress towards the goal.

This doesn't need to be formal – in fact I recommend it isn't. But one way or the other you need to be talking to your boss about your progress at least once every couple of months. Do not let it go for six months or a year and then bring it up again all of a sudden – that’s just making the same mistake all over again. And when you do talk to your boss about it, keep it light, let her know how good you’re doing on your journey but don’t push it too hard.

If you’d like to read more tips for getting promotions check out my recent article on careerealism.com

 

6 Career Changes I'd Make if I had a Time Machine

Lately I've been thinking a lot about my younger self. Mostly I've been thinking about all the mistakes I made early on in my career. Check out this slide-share and see the 6 pieces of advice I'd give the 25 year old version of me if I had a time machine.


New Boss? Company Acquired? 3 Tips to Take Advantage of Change

In my experience, the greatest moments for career advancement come in times of uncertainty and disruption. I know this sounds counter intuitive but its very true and something most of us overlook or won't admit. During highly tumultuous periods, like in an acquisition or management shake-up, the opportunities are actually at their greatest and your competition are at their worst. In these chaotic times, roles change, departments get reorganized and objectives and power shift. If you execute strategically you can find many career advancing opportunities. If you operate emotionally (like most people) you can lose out on your best chance to get ahead. While your peers are rebelling to change and worrying what the future may hold, you need to be executing your advancement strategy. Here are some tips for how to embrace change from the book Stealing the Corner Office:

A very important first step is to create a Change Playbook so you can take advantage of these moments when they present themselves. I find it helpful to document my game plan when I see big changes coming. The process of actually writing my plan down helps to remind me how important it is to be consciously executing purposeful tactics during these periods versus reacting emotionally.

I recently met with a business partner who confided in me within an hour of meeting him that he had a new boss he couldn't stand. He just couldn't figure out how to deal with him and he and the rest of the team missed their old boss immensely. As much as he delivered the polite version of his plight, it was pretty obvious that he and his peers were not handling this change scenario well.  A management change is almost universally mishandled by staff who fight against what has already taken place in some naive hope their discontent can actually reverse time. In this case, when your peers are all gossiping and griping about the evil new boss, you should be actively networking with him or her and finding ways to be helpful in the transition. Getting on the winning side of change is as much about choosing to play on the winning team as it is about any specific strategy. Having a positive attitude and aligning yourself with the eventual winners are your keys to success.

So when change is afoot, I jot down a few key notes in three basic areas to guide my behaviors. It reminds me that my goal is to get ahead in the company and not to vent my emotions or misgivings about the situation. Here is a sample of what that might look like:

Figure 1: Sample Change Playbook

Figure 1: Sample Change Playbook

The first area I focus on is my Influencer List. It has most likely evolved as a result of the change that has occurred. I make a quick list of who the key players are and who can most profoundly influence my success or failure in the new environment. My only caution is not to let any personal misgivings cloud your assessment of who actually has power and influence. Sometimes we can convince ourselves power hasn’t shifted when in fact it has.

The second thing I take note of is what key transition projects are likely to take place or have been scheduled already. I want to be a part of these and will do whatever I can to participate. These will come in the form of process alignment meetings, systems integrations, best practice sharing and a variety of other events. They all have the goal of smoothing the transition from the old way to the new way. You will participate on these committees and in these meetings ostensibly to help in the transition most importantly you’re tactically demonstrating leadership and networking with the winning team.

The final area I make note of is how I can advance my position during the change period. Specifically, what actions I will take to proactively improve my status. This can include things like booking a meeting with the new boss to understand her priorities and challenges. It might be taking one or two new people out for lunch or dinner after an acquisition. It can be the small things and conversations that reveal the best opportunities for career advancements in a highly dynamic environment. If you see yourself doing the same old routine, or trying to ignore the chaos around you – you should stop and get involved.

The most important thing in taking advantage of change scenarios is your attitude. Get on the winning team. Do the opposite of what the masses are doing. Find opportunities to demonstrate leadership in the face of disruption which will often be present during this times. Get strategic during turmoil and you will rise to the top.

Here are three quick tips that will make sure you embrace the changes everyone else hates and ultimately end up on top:

  • Make a change plan. You need to actually write down what your plan is or your emotions will likely get the best of you. Jot down some tactics when a major transition occurs to force yourself to act strategically and not emotionally.
  • Pick the winner with your mind not your heart. Make an objective assessment of which side is likely to come out on top and join that team. If someone has just bought your company or has just taken over your department – choose that team. Don’t fight against the winning side.
  •  Leave your ego at the door. If you execute the correct change playbook, people will make fun of you and tease you for being a suck up. Ignore them. Your career is not about making friends, it’s about advancement.